Heaven on Earth: The Lives and Legacies of the Worl’ds Greatest Cathedrals

A glorious illustrated history of sixteen of the world’s greatest cathedrals, interwoven with the extraordinary stories of the people who built them.

The emergence of the Gothic in twelfth-century France, an architectural style characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, flying buttresses, large windows and elaborate tracery, triggered an explosion of cathedral-building across western Europe. It is this remarkable flowering of ecclesiastical architecture that forms the central core of Emma Wells’s authoritative but accessible study of the golden age of the cathedral. Prefacing her account with the construction in the sixth century of the Hagia Sophia, the remarkable Christian cathedral of the eastern Roman empire, she goes on to chart the construction of a glittering sequence of iconic structures, including Saint-Denis, Notre-Dame, Canterbury, Chartres, Salisbury, York Minster and Florence’s Duomo.

More than architectural biographies, these are human stories of triumph and tragedy that take the reader from the chaotic atmosphere of the mason’s yard to the cloisters of power. Together, they reveal how 1000 years of cathedral-building shaped modern Europe, and influenced art, culture and society around the world.

Nistisima: The secret to delicious vegan cooking from the Mediterranean and beyond

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No fads, no frills, just 120 vegan recipes that have stood the test of time from award-winning food writer Georgina Hayden.

Nistisima means fasting food – food eaten during Lent and other times of fasting observed by those of Orthodox faith. Mostly this involves giving up meat and dairy and instead using vegetables, pulses and grains to create easy, delicious dishes that all just happen to be vegan.

In this book, Georgina draws on the history and culture around nistisimo cooking in the Mediterranean, Middle East and Eastern Europe to share the simple, nutritious and flavour-packed recipes at the heart of the practice.

Whether you’re vegan, vegetarian, or simply want to eat more plant-based food, Nistisima offers you tried and tested recipes that celebrate the very best of this tradition – all bursting with flavour and all surprisingly vegan.
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‘Mouthwatering recipes and beautiful storytelling – I want a seat at Georgie’s table.’ JAMIE OLIVER

The Political Parties of Ireland: A Concise Guide

From the nationalist, unionist and labour traditions to today’s fascinating array of parties, the history of Ireland’s political parties is a tangled web that has finally, for the first time, been expertly unravelled and explained in a single volume.

In addition to charting the successes and setbacks of all the major parties and the impact they and their leaders have had on Ireland’s history, Lila Haines’ scholarly yet very accessible study also reflects on how smaller parties have influenced the direction of political travel.

Drawing widely on original sources, contemporary journalism, political memoirs, respected historians as well as accounts by key backroom participants, Lila Haines skilfully reveals the power struggles and collaborations, splinters and mergers, and the ideals and deals that changed Ireland.

The Political Parties of Ireland is an indispensible companion for all who wish to know how Ireland’s political parties have evolved, and how their electoral journeys are shaping the future of the island they share.

There’s Been a Little Incident

A witty and warm debut novel from a young Irish writer. A story of family, grief, and the ways we come together when all seems lost.

‘There’s been a little incident…’

Molly Black has disappeared. She’s been a bit flighty since her parents died (sure, hadn’t she run off with a tree surgeon that time?) but this time, or so says her hastily written leaving note, she’s gone for good.

That’s why the whole Black clan – from Granny perched on the printer all the way through to Killian on Zoom from Sydney – is huddled together in the back room of Uncle John’s semi-D in the Dublin suburbs, arguing over what to do.

Cousin Bobby’s having a hard enough time of it as it is, convincing his family he’s happy single and childless. Lady V reckons this is all much too much fuss over a thirty year old. And Uncle Danny knows all too well how it feels to be lost with no one trying to find you.

But Uncle John is determined never to lose anyone again. Especially not his niece, who is more like her mum than she realises.

Praise for There’s Been a Little Incident:

‘Here is a story that takes on grief in its many insidious guises, and yet this brave, big-hearted novel is full of warmth and wisdom. Clever, funny and an utterly life-enhancing read’ Christine Dwyer Hickey

The Homemade Year

Lilly Higgins is the ultimate modern homemaker. Here she shares over 70 things to make, do and eat at home to welcome every season.

With many of us spending more time at home nowadays, finding things to do around the house is something we have grown to appreciate more than ever. Whether it’s baking, knitting or finding things to make and do with children, these calm, creative moments will make beautiful memories of a happy home.

Here you’ll be inspired by ideas for family celebrations, crafts to cosy up your interiors, activities to do with kids and simple ways to welcome the seasons.

Reflecting the Irish calendar, from St Brigid’s crosses in February to Christmas wreaths in December, The Homemade Year will help you move gently through the months and make everyday moments special.

Undercurrent

‘The beginning of summer. Perhaps it crosses my mind even now while I wait for news of Amy that something is coming towards us. Like sighting the first slow swell of a wave.’

Years ago, in an almost accidental moment of heroism, Ed saved Amy from drowning. Now, in his thirties, he finds himself adrift. He’s been living in London for years – some of them good – but he’s stuck in a relationship he can’t move forward, has a job that just pays the bills, and can’t shake the sense that life should mean more than this. Perhaps all Ed needs is a moment to pause. To exhale and start anew. And when he meets Amy again by chance, it seems that happiness might not be so far out of reach. But then tragedy overtakes him, and Ed must decide whether to let history and duty define his life, or whether he should push against the tide and write his own story.

Filled with hope and characteristic warmth, Undercurrent is a moving and intimate portrait of love, of life and why we choose to share ours with the people we do.

Swanfolk

An astonishing mind-bending novel about a woman’s discovery of a community of swan-people from one of Iceland’s greatest writers.

In the not-too-distant future, a young spy named Elisabet Eva is about to discover something that will upend her carefully controlled life.

Elisabet’s work is the lynchpin of her existence in the city; her friends and social life centre around the Special Unit. But recently Elisabet has found herself taking long solitary walks near the lake. One day, she sees two creatures emerging from the water, half-human, half-swan. She follows them through tangles of thickets into a strange new reality.

Elisabet’s walks turn into regular visits to these swan women, who reveal to her the enigma of their secret existence, and their deepest desires. Pulled further and further into the monomaniacal, and often violent, quest of the swanfolk she finds her own mind increasingly untrustworthy. Ultimately, Elisabet is forced to reckon with both the consequences of her involvement with these unusual beings and a past life she has been trying to evade.

*SHORTLISTED FOR THE ICELANDIC WOMEN’S LITERATURE PRIZE*

PRAISE FOR KRISTIN OMARSDOTTIR:
‘Omarsdottir’s skills as a poet and playwright are evident’ Helen Oyeyemi, New York Review of Books

Where the Wildflowers Grow: My Botanical Jounrney Through Britain and Ireland

‘A heart-warming, fascination-inducing read from start to finish.’ – Lucy Lapwing

‘An extraordinary book… captivating in its joy for the natural world.’ – Isabel Hardman

‘When was the last time you stopped and noticed a wild plant?’

An intriguing and timely exploration of the importance of Britain and Ireland’s plant life.

Leif Bersweden has always been fascinated by wild plants. From a young age, his afternoons were spent hunting for and cataloguing the plants in his local area. But it is a landscape that is fast disappearing.
Climate change, habitat destruction and declining pollinator populations mean that the future for plant life looks bleaker than ever before. Many of us are also unable to identify, or even notice, the plants that grow around us.

Now a botanist, Leif decides to go on a mission, to explore the plants that Britain and Ireland have to offer and to meet those who spend time searching for them. Over the course of a year, Leif goes on a journey around the UK and Ireland, highlighting the unique plants that grow there, their history and the threats that face them. His journey takes him from the Cornish coast to the pine forests of Scotland – even to the streets of London, proving that nature can be found in the most unexpected places. Along the way, Leif highlights the joy and positivity that can be found through understanding nature and why it is so desperately important to protect our wildflowers.

How to Win Friends and Influence People

Dale Carnegie’s famous confidence-boosting bestseller has transformed the personal and professional lives of millions around the world. Now it’s been fully revised and updated for the next generation of leaders.

This new edition of the most influential self-help book of the last century has been updated under the care of Dale’s daughter, Donna, introducing changes that keep the book fresh for today’s readers, with priceless material restored from the original 1936 text.

One of the best-known motivational guides in history, Dale Carnegie’s ground-breaking publication has sold tens of millions of copies, been translated into almost every known written language and helped countless people succeed.

Carnegie’s rock-solid, experience-tested advice has remained relevant for generations because he addresses timeless questions about the art of getting along with people. How to Win Friends and Influence People teaches you:

-How to communicate effectively
-How to make people like you
-How to increase your ability to get things done
-How to get others to see your side
-How to become a more effective leader
-How to successfully navigate almost any social situation
-And so much more!

How to Win Friends and Influence People is a historic bestseller for one simple reason: its crucial life lessons, conveyed through engaging storytelling, have shown readers how to become who they wish to be. With the newly updated version of this classic, that’s as true now as ever.

How To Live With Each Other: An Anthropologist’s Notes on Sharing a Divided World

An anthropologist looks at our modern world – and shows how we can build a better, more connected one

Increasingly, we are coming to see difference, whether in the form of conflicting values or growing ethnic diversity, as an existential threat. Within much of the world, our main response has been to surround ourselves with like-minded people and double down on our own convictions, in an attempt to hold difference at bay. So, how did we get here, and what can we do about it?

Here, anthropologist Farhan Samanani combines case studies from across the world with his own research to provide insights into the capacity of humankind to connect across divides. Using his anthropologist’s toolkit, he explores the roots of our present tensions and casts fresh light on how we can cultivate common ground, build healthy communities and not just live but flourish together.

The Queen of Dirt Island

From the award-winning, Booker longlisted author of the number one bestseller, STRANGE FLOWERS, a searing, jubilant novel about four generations of women and the love and stories that bind them.

‘One of the finest novelists writing today… a haunting, exquisite masterpiece.’ RACHEL JOYCE

‘A generous mosaic of a novel about the staying power of love and pride and history and family’ COLUM McCANN

The Aylward women are mad about each other, but you wouldn’t always think it. You’d have to know them to know – in spite of what the neighbours might say about raised voices and dramatic scenes – that their house is a place of peace, filled with love, a refuge from the sadness and cruelty of the world.

Their story begins at an end and ends at a beginning. It’s a story of terrible betrayals and fierce loyalties, of isolation and togetherness, of transgression, forgiveness, desire, and love. About all the things family can be and all the things it sometimes isn’t. More than anything, it is an uplifting celebration of fierce, loyal love and the powerful stories that last generations.
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‘Beautifully poised, sad, poetic and human….I loved every single line.’ IAN RANKIN

‘His paragraphs are unnoticeably beautiful, his heart always on show’ ANNE ENRIGHT

‘Endlessly surprising and incredibly moving’ DAVID NICHOLLS

‘A life-enhancing talent’ SEBASTIAN BARRY

‘I would struggle to think of any other Irish author working today who writes with as much compassion as Donal Ryan’ LOUISE O’NEILL

Train Lord

Oliver Mol was a successful, clever, healthy twenty-five-year old. Then one day the migraine started. For ten months, the pain was constant, exacerbated by writing, reading, using computers, looking at phones or anything with a screen. Slowly, Oliver began to disappear.

One evening, Oliver googled the only thing he could think of: ‘full-time job, no experience, Sydney’. An ad for a train guard appeared. For two years Oliver watched others live their lives, observing the intimacy of strangers brought together briefly and connected by the steady march of time.

Exquisitely written and bravely told, Train Lord is a searingly personal yet hugely relatable book, which asks what happens when your sense of self is suddenly destroyed, and how you get it back.

How to Grow Your Own Poem

Do you want to write a poem? This book will show you ‘how to grow your own poem’…

Kate Clanchy has been teaching people to write poetry for more than twenty years. Some were old, some were young; some were fluent English speakers, some were not. None of them were confident to start with, but a surprising number went to win prizes and every one finished up with a poem they were proud of, a poem that only they could have written – their own poem.

Kate’s big secret is a simple one: to share other poems. She believes poetry is like singing or dancing and the best way to learn is to follow someone else. In this book, Kate shares the poems she has found provoke the richest responses, the exercises that help to shape those responses into new poems, and the advice that most often helps new writers build their own writing practice.

If you have never written a poem before, this book will get you started. If you have written poems before, this book will help you to write more fluently and confidently, more as yourself. This book not like other creative writing books. It doesn’t ask you to set out on your own, but to join in. Your invitation is inside.

The Normans in Ireland: Leinster, 1167-1247

The Norman invasion of Britain, as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry, is well known, but the later invasion of Ireland is much less well documented. Yet much of what we see today in Irish heritage has Norman roots. Ireland and Britain have many similarities, although relations between them have too often descended into bitterness and violence. This book goes back to the starting point of this, more than eight hundred years ago. Beginning with Irish history before the Norman invasion, the book describes how Ireland was conquered and settled by the French-speaking Normans from north-west France, whose language and culture had already come to dominate most of Britain.

It looks at the creation and government of a large region called the Liberty of Leinster between 1167 and 1247, a turning point in Irish history, identifying the Frankish institutions imposed upon Ireland by its Anglo-Norman conquerors. The Normans were not always belligerent conquerors, but they were innovators and reformers, who incorporated the sensible traditions and practices of their subjugated lands into their new government. In little over one hundred years the Normans had a transforming effect on British and Irish societies and, while different in many ways, both countries benefited from their legacy.

The Wars of the Bruces: Scotland, England and Ireland 1306 – 1328

The Bruces of fourteenth-century Scotland were formidable and enthusiastic warriors. Whilst much has been written about events as they happened in Scotland during the chaotic years of the first part of the fourteenth century, England’s war with Robert the Bruce profoundly affected the whole of the British Isles. Scottish raiders struck deep into the heartlands of Yorkshire and Lancashire; Robert’s younger brother, Edward Bruce, was proclaimed King of Ireland and came close to subduing the country; the Isle of Man was captured and a Welsh sea-port was raided; and in the North Sea Scots allied with German and Flemish pirates to cripple England’s vital wool trade and disrupt its war effort.

Packed with detail and written with a strong and involving narrative thread, this is the first book to link up the various theatres of war and discuss the effect of the wars of the Bruces outside Scotland.

The Marsh House

Part ghost story, part novel of suspense The Marsh House is the haunting second novel from the author of The Night of the Flood where two women, separated by decades, are drawn together by one, mysterious house on the North Norfolk coast.

‘Part ghost story, part thriller, I loved it’ Louise Hare, author of This Lovely City

December, 1962. Desperate to create a happy Christmas for her young daughter, Franny, after a disastrous year, Malorie rents a remote house on the Norfolk coast. But once there, the strained silence between them feels louder than ever. As Malorie digs for decorations in the attic, she comes across the notebooks of the teenaged Rosemary, who lived in the house thirty years before. Trapped inside by a blizzard, and with long days and nights ahead of her, Malorie begins to read. Though she knows she needs to focus on the present, she finds herself inexorably drawn into the past…

July, 1931. Rosemary lives in the Marsh House with her austere father, surrounded by unspoken truths and rumours. So when the glamorous Lafferty family moves to the village, she succumbs easily to their charm. Dazzled by the beautiful Hilda and her dashing brother, Franklin, Rosemary fails to see the danger that lurks beneath their bright facades…

As Malorie reads Rosemary’s diary, past and present begin to merge in this moving story of mothers and daughters, family obligation and deeply buried secrets.

Praise for The Marsh House:

‘A satisfyingly dark, gothic tale where the past is never far behind you’ Rhiannon Ward, author of The Quickening

‘Beautifully written, atmospheric as hell, and elegantly constructed, the story of The Marsh House will draw you into its grip and never let go till the final word’ Jane Johnson, author of The Sea Gate

‘Deliciously eerie and unsettling, The Marsh House had me bewitched from page one. I loved its layers of history and secrets. A haunting gem of a book’ Susan Allott, author of The Silence

‘A fabulous read, deft and precise, with a satisfying mystery at its centre, based upon a beautifully compassionate reading of the tradition of English folk magic’ Amanda Mason, author of The Hiding Place

‘Immersed in the landscape of the North Norfolk coast, this is a clever, suspenseful novel that kept me intrigued. Part ghost story, part thriller, I loved it’ Louise Hare, author of This Lovely City

Remembering Che: My Life With Che Guevar

The Furrows

I don’t want to tell you what happened; I want to tell you how it felt.

Cassandra Williams is twelve; her little brother Wayne is seven. One day, when they are alone together, there is an accident, and Wayne is lost forever. Though his body is never recovered, their mother is unable to stop searching. The missing boy cleaves the family with doubt: How do you grieve an absence? And how does it feel?

As C grows older, she relives and retells her story, and she sees her brother everywhere: in coffee shops, subway cars, cities on both sides of America. Here is her brother’s older face, the colour of his eyes, his lanky limbs, the way he seems to recognise her too. But it can’t be, of course. Or can it? And then one day, there is another accident, and C meets a man both mysterious and familiar, a man who is also searching for someone, as well as his own place in the world. His name is Wayne.

Namwali Serpell’s piercing new novel captures the ongoing and uncanny experience of grief, as the past breaks over the present, like waves in the sea. The Furrows is a bold and beautiful exploration of memory and mourning that twists unexpectedly into a masterful story of mistaken identity, slippery reality, black experience, and the wishful and sometimes willful longing for reunion with those we’ve lost.

The Long Knives

Justice can be a blunt instrument

“Men like him usually tell the story.
In business.
Politics.
Media.
But not this time: I repeat, he is not writing this story.”

Ritchie Gulliver MP is dead. Castrated and left to bleed in an empty Leith warehouse.

Vicious, racist and corrupt, many thought he had it coming. But nobody could have predicted this.

After the life Gulliver has led, the suspects are many: corporate rivals, political opponents, the countless groups he’s offended. And the vulnerable and marginalised, who bore the brunt of his cruelty – those without a voice, without a choice, without a chance.

As Detective Ray Lennox unravels the truth, and the list of brutal attacks grows, he must put his personal feelings aside. But one question refuses to go away…

Who are the real victims here?

Killernova

The island of Borneo was once the most heavily wooded in the world, and its people have always carved wood beautifully. In KILLERNOVA, grappling with his heritage, Omar Musa remixes this ancient art form with fiery poetry forged in the stars. With equal parts swagger, humour and vulnerability, Musa charts a journey through the colonial history of South-East Asia, environmental destruction, oceans, bushfires, race, the isolation and addiction of COVID lockdown, family, lost love and, ultimately, recovery. Relentlessly on beat, visually captivating and deceptively intimate, this is a collection of words and art that burns blindingly bright.

PRAISE for Killernova:

Omar Musa is a rare kind. As visual in his poetry as he is poetic in his visuals. This collection allows us to to dive deeper into his worlds, to experience the poems alongside the carvings adds greater dimension to each.
– KAE TEMPEST

Omar?s poetry slips between two worlds, between play and dread, the sacred and the mundane, with Houdini-like ease. He leans into the mystery, while bringing down the hammer. Like if Frank Ocean ghost-wrote Nostradamus.
– HERA LINDSAY BIRD

Omar Musa?s latest work explodes on the page like a dazzling fireworks display, endlessly surprising and beautiful. Killernova is a book to keep close to the heart, forever.
– TASH AW

Pretentious literary navel-gazing. This will go well when thrown into the circle jerk of writers festivals and resin-jewellery led artists panels. That said, it?s hard to deny the Queanbeyan edge that penetrates these whimsical post-national musings. The man?s pretty handy with a linoleum cutter too.
– THE BETOOTA ADVOCATE

PRAISE for Omar Musa:

Omar Musa is a special writer with his own beat, cutting through worlds.
– MOHSIN HAMID

Never mind page versus stage, this is poetry: listen.
– JEET THAYIL

[s]uch swaggering exuberance that it will make most other fiction you read this year seem criminally dull. You have been warned.
– IRVINE WELSH

[A] writer with the attuned ear of a great poet, the narrative gifts of seasoned novelist, and no slight exposure to the beautiful struggle.
– MITCHELL S. JACKSON

Musa is a poet and every page speaks to his ferocious talent.
– FATIMA BHUTTO

Each poem in Musa’s Millefiori beats with a large heart.
– GREGORY PARDLO

Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale

The White Rock

In a spellbinding narrative of sacrifice and survival, chaos and connection, four characters are caught up in the tides of history over three centuries and drawn to the sacred White Rock of San Blas off the coast of Mexico.
In 2020 an Englishwoman travels to give thanks for her child, a singer in 1969 runs from the law, from his rabid fans and an America burning with the fever of the Vietnam War, two Yoeme sisters are torn from their homeland at the start of the twentieth century, and in 1775 a Spanish Lieutenant prepares to set sail from the White Rock to continue the conquest of the Pacific coast.
The White Rock is a breathtaking novel about what happens when the stories we have lived by can no longer keep us safe.

Carrie Soto Is Back

From the bestselling author of MALIBU RISING, DAISY JONES & THE SIX and THE SEVEN HUSBANDS OF EVELYN HUGO

‘Thank you Taylor Jenkins Reid for the escapism we all need’ PANDORA SYKES

Carrie Soto is fierce, and her determination to win at any cost has not made her popular.

By the time Carrie retires from tennis, she is the best player the world has ever seen. She has shattered every record and claimed twenty Slam titles. And if you ask her, she is entitled to every one. She sacrificed nearly everything to become the best, with her father as her coach.

But six years after her retirement, Carrie finds herself sitting in the stands of the 1994 US Open, watching her record be taken from her by a brutal, stunning, British player named Nicki Chan.

At thirty-seven years old, Carrie makes the monumental decision to come out of retirement and be coached by her father for one last year in an attempt to reclaim her record. Even if the sports media says that they never liked the ‘Battle-Axe’ anyway. Even if her body doesn’t move as fast as it did. And even if it means swallowing her pride to train with a man she once almost opened her heart to: Bowe Huntley. Like her, he has something to prove before he gives up the game forever.

In spite of it all: Carrie Soto is back, for one epic final season. In this riveting and unforgettable novel, Taylor Jenkins Reid tells a story about the cost of greatness and a legendary athlete attempting a comeback.

Praise for MALIBU RISING:
‘It’s 365 pages of pure exhilaration’ THE TIMES
‘The perfect, literal, beach read, with the emotional depth of the ocean’ HOLLY BOURNE

Still Water

‘BEAUTIFUL AND BRUTAL…A BREATHTAKING DEBUT’ JOANNA CANNON

‘ATMOSPHERIC AND COMPELLING’ KATE SAWYER, author of the Costa-shortlisted The Stranding

‘A HAUNTING STORY…TOLD WITH COMPASSION AND EVEN TENDERNESS’ KATIE MUNNIK

A beautifully written atmospheric story of trauma, grief and redemption, Still Water is a debut from a bright new voice in literary fiction.

When Jane Douglas returns to the Shetland Islands, she thinks she has escaped the dark shadows of her childhood. She carves out a simple life on the bleak, windswept island, working at the salmon fishery and spending quiet evenings at home. And for the first time in her life, she’s happy.

Then the body of Jane’s long-missing mother is found in a flooded quarry. Her mother disappeared when Jane was a teenager, following the death of Jane’s baby brother. Jane has spent her life running from her past, living in fear that she has inherited her mother’s demons. Now, Jane must face what actually happened on that fateful, tragic day twenty years ago…

‘INTENSE, UNFLINCHING, HONEST… BEAUTIFULLY TOLD’ LUCIE MCKNIGHT HARDY, author of Dead Relatives